Thursday, September 22, 2016

Welcome Drew Family Wines!

Langdon Shiverick is pleased to welcome Drew Family Wines! Crafting wines from Mendocino Ridge and Anderson Valley in Mendocino County, their line of cool-climate Pinot Noir and Syrah is a great addition to our domestic portfolio.


Mendocino is one of California’s largest and most diverse appellations. Located about 150 miles from San Francisco, it has never been as developed as the Napa and Sonoma Valleys further south. Within the coastal zone of Mendocino County likes the Mendocino Ridge AVA. A cool climate and high altitude area roughly 36 miles long, the designation is unique in that it is limited by elevation, reserved for vineyards stilling at 1200 feet or higher that are within 10 miles of the Pacific Ocean. Just inland from the Mendocino Ridge lies Anderson Valley. Though lower in altitude than the mountains to the west, the valley AVA still ranges in altitude from 800-1500 feet above sea level and has only a handful of vineyards on flat land.

This distinctive and remote area is where Jason and Molly Drew founded Drew Family Wines in 2000. In 2004 they stumbled upon an old neglected 26-acre orchard for sale and decided this would be their estate. While others saw a daunting project in this old orchard property, Jason and Molly saw ancient oceanic soils, south facing slopes and a true coastal climate, with the ocean a mere 3.3 miles away. They eventually planted their seven acre estate Pinot Noir vineyard organically, and it just produced its first crop in 2014.

With over 25 years in the wine business in Central and Northern California, Jason Drew brings a vast depth of knowledge and a holistic perspective to his winemaking.  Drew focuses on small lot coastal Pinot Noir and Syrah from Anderson Valley and the Mendocino Ridge. For his sourced fruit, he has long standing partnerships with several local vineyard growers who share his passion for sustainable and meticulous farming practices. Single vineyard sources are chosen for their climate, clonal selection and complexity of soil type. Winemaking practices remain focused on traditional methods that include whole cluster and native yeast fermentations, hand punchdowns and no fining or filtration.

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